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Category Archives: Healthy Water

Are You Drinking Enough Water?

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With summer right around the corner and rising temperatures, it is important to stay adequately hydrated! Since up to 60% of your body is water, it is a vital part in ensuring every part of your body is working properly. From flushing waste and toxins to keeping your body at an optimum temperature, water helps to keep us alive!

Throughout the day, your body loses water through urine, breathing and sweat glands. As a result, you have to constantly replenish this fluid, and sugary sodas and coffee do not count toward this requirement. Because of the high caffeine content in these drinks, they can dehydrate your body. Sticking to pure, clean water is best when rehydrating. Once your body has already lost 1-2% of it’s total water content, you will begin to experience your body’s natural mechanism that tells you when you need to replenish your water supply- thirst. However, by the time you are thirsty, your body may already be a bit dehydrated. Studies have indicated that about 66% of us are dehydrated and need to drink more water.

Before your signals that you are thirsty, learn the subtler signs your body sends, indicating you need to drink more water.

  • Fatigue or moodiness
  • Hunger even after a recent meal
  • Infrequent urination, dark concentrated urine

Besides paying attention to the above signs, a good indicator is to look at the color of your urine. You should be consuming enough water so your urine is a light yellow. How often you urinate can also be used to judge your intake of water. A well-hydrated person urinates about 7-8 times per day. If you haven’t gone to the bathroom in several hours, it is a good indication that you may be dehydrated. A good guideline is to drink six- eight, 8-ounce glasses of water every day. Some adults may need more or less, depending on how active and healthy they are and what type of climate they live in. Some good tips for staying hydrated are:

  • Drink a glass after every time you use the bathroom
  • Sip before every meal
  • Keep a glass of water on your bedside table to drink first thing when you wake BEFORE coffee or tea
  • Invest in a reusable water bottle to sip from throughout the day

By depriving ourselves of water, we are continuously damaging our bodies. Listening and being in tune to your body’s signals will help you stay healthier and live happier.

What is Reverse Osmosis?

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If you’ve ever tasted a glass of water that came from a Reverse Osmosis system, you know that crisp, refreshing taste of pure, clean water that is incomparable to anything else.

Reverse Osmosis is defined as “a process by which molecules of a solvent tend to pass through a semipermeable membrane from a less concentrated solution into a more concentrated one, thus equalizing the concentrations on each side of the membrane.” Reverse Osmosis is simply the opposite of that process.

Reverse Osmosis or RO is a highly advanced and innovative process of filtering water. An RO filter has a semi-permeable membrane that by applying substantial amounts of pressure, allows clean water molecules to flow through while rejecting contaminants, dissolved solids, and other particles; thus removing sediment, toxic metals, bacteria, and chemicals.

A Reverse Osmosis system works in multiple stages. First, water passes through the particle filter to remove impurities like salt and sediment. Then the water passes through an activated carbon filter that removes minerals and contaminants such as chlorine, mercury and pesticides. The water is then forced through the membrane’s tiny holes where the smallest impurities are trapped and only clean water passes through. Finally, the water flows through another activated carbon filter as a final polish to ensure all contaminants have been removed.

The Reverse Osmosis filtration process is highly effective and proven technology that removes over 99% of harmful contaminates including: Fluoride, Lead, Chlorine, Pesticides, Detergents, Nitrates & Sulfates. In addition to removing harmful contaminants, a Reverse Osmosis system also removes harmless nuisances that may change the look, smell or taste of your water. With an RO system, you’ll have peace of mind knowing that your office is drinking clean, healthy and pure water.

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Resources:

  1. Pure Water Tech
  2. Dictionary.com
  3. Advanced Water Filters
  4. Freshly Squeezed Water

Plastics Can be a Danger to Your Health

Plastics can a danger to your health

Recycled bottled water usage is on the rise.  Most people believe drinking out of recycled plastic bottles is more healthy. But did you know plastics can actually be harmful to your health?  Studies have shown the presence of thousands of man-made chemicals in a single water bottle, chemicals such as BPA.  BPA can easily leach from the plastic into the water you drink and impact the hormones in your body.

Bacteria in the water is also a major concern.  According to a North Dakota State University study, by reusing a plastic drinking water bottle many germs enter into the water you drink through salvia.  Some of the tests on the bottles after many days of use even found the presence fecal matter.

Put down the plastic today! For more information:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/131685-health-effects-plastic-

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Local schools testing for lead in water

North Metro School District Plans New Lead Water Testing

September 23, 2016 06:11 PM

The Centennial School District alerted parents this week that they will begin testing all of their buildings for possible lead in the drinking water.

Earlier this month, the district was highlighted in a 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS investigation that showed they had not tested for lead in drinking water since 1998.

“The Minnesota Department of Health recommends schools test their water supply every five years. This is a guideline, not a requirement. Nevertheless, we are finalizing a vendor to test all water supply sources to identify any issues with the drinking water in our schools,” the district wrote to parents.

“I guess I had assumed that was happening,” Centennial parent Alyssa Donely said. “When I got the email, I was kind of taken back that it hadn’t happened in a long time.”

Our news staff poured over the water testing records of more than 600 Minnesota schools and found at least one out of every four of those schools are not following the state’s recommendations that a school be tested at least once every five years.

For more information go to

http://kstp.com/news/centennial-school-district-anoka-county-lead-water-testing-drinking-system/4272182/?cat=1

Dangerous Lead in Minnesota Schools

Kids at Risk: Minnesota Schools Failing to Follow Guidelines on Testing for Lead in Water

September 08, 2016 11:17 AM

School officials across Minnesota are knowingly putting thousands of children at serious risk by not following guidelines on testing for lead in water and not fixing water systems that they know are defective, a 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS investigation has found.

Our news staff poured over the water testing records of more than 600 Minnesota schools and found at least one out of every four of those schools are not following the state’s recommendations that a school be tested at least once every five years. We found some schools that have not been tested for lead since the late 1990s.

When looking at the reports in the map embedded below, keep in mind the Minnesota Department of Health’s guideline for schools: If lead is at or below 20 parts per billion (ppb), the tap may be used for drinking water or food preparation. If lead exceeds 20 ppb, twice daily flushing should be done.

School districts are not on the hook for exposing children to increased health risks by having high amounts of lead in water, 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS found: The Minnesota Department of Health only recommends that schools test each tap or fixture providing water at least every five years.

And, it appears the department is lax when it comes to its oversight of monitoring schools that have gone long periods of not testing water. For example, records show Minneapolis Public Schools has not tested at least 31 of its schools since 1998. A district alternative school for pregnant and parenting students – Longfellow School – was last tested for lead amounts in 1998, according to district records.

“It’s a little surprising to me to hear that there are systems that have not been tested for very long periods of time,” Assistant Commissioner of Health Paul Allwood said. “I should point out that our guidelines are voluntary,” Allwood added. “That’s what we’re discussing – should there be additional authority.”

Document: MDH Guidance on Reducing Lead in Drinking Water

Minnesota communities that receive municipal water already test for lead in the system but health officials suggest schools test due to possible lead solder, brass fixtures, water usage and age of materials that could be in the water system students could drink from.

Dr. Marc Edwards, the nation’s leading authority on lead amounts in water, said in an interview that lead amounts of more than 20 parts per billion (ppb) is a critical health concern. Edwards is a professor at the Virginia Tech University and led the outcry over the recent contaminated water crisis in Flint, Michigan.

KSTP reporter Eric Chaloux went to Edwards’ lab on campus on in Blacksburg, Virginia, to learn more.

“Parents really need to hold schools’ feet to the fire to make sure this problem is fixed,” Edwards said. It costs as little as $30 to fix the problem when it comes to water fountains and high amounts of lead coming out of them, he said.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recently stated school water fountains should not exceed water lead concentrations of more than 1 ppb.

In our records review, news reporters and producers found that school children from Burnsville, Savage and Eagan – District 191 – were exposed to lead levels up to 942 ppb from one drinking fountain tested in 2013. That amount ranks as one of highest contaminant levels detected in the records reviewed. That fountain is at Joseph Nicollet Junior High School in Burnsville.

“One drink from that fountain, that’s a health concern,” Edwards said when he reviewed those specific results.

More more infomation:
http://kstp.com/news/minnesota-schools-water-lead-investigation-testing-guidelines-minnesota-department-of-health/4257404/?cat=1

Minnesota Water’s purification systems are an excellent alternative to traditional bottled jugs as well as bottleless water coolers. Our state of the art filtration systems transforms your tap water through a four stage reverse osmosis process into pure, clean, refreshing drinking water. Minnesota Water proudly serves the 7 county metro area including Minneapolis, St. Paul, Eden Prairie, Bloomington, Prior Lake, Eagan, Apple Valley, Woodbury, White Bear Lake, Blaine, Wright, Stearns, Sherburne, Isanti, Chisago, Meeker, and surrounding areas.